Surrendering to the Knife

Are you having, or have you had a Lateral Internal Sphincterotomy (LIS)? Please share your experiences here, or ask any questions.

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Re: Surrendering to the Knife

Postby jr2 » 06 Mar 2013, 20:48

the days before a surgery are so incredibly nerve wracking.
But yeah, that sounds pretty standard for pre-op.
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Re: Surrendering to the Knife

Postby coconut » 06 Mar 2013, 21:16

^I suppose you really aren't meant to binge eat at 11:55 either. Bummer. I have been binge drinking water through. I don't know what that is going to do but make me wake up to pee tonight, but I fear dehydration because my brain needs something to do other than sleep.
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Re: Surrendering to the Knife

Postby Rachael 1984 » 07 Mar 2013, 06:21

Great Coconut. Keep moving on, good luck.
Think when we all heal, nothing could ever be as bad as this AF hell! Image
Hem Banding sept 2012
2Fissures
Nitro- Effective short term
April 2013-Botox-Effective short term
Diltazem-No effect, developed Rash
July 2014-Diagnosed High Resting Pressure
LIS performed on 17.9.14
Ongoing pain/re-tears. Awaiting pressure test results.
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Re: Surrendering to the Knife

Postby Klainn » 07 Mar 2013, 16:57

Coconut,
Hopefully your procedure went smooth. I look forward to hearing about your experience.
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Re: Surrendering to the Knife

Postby coconut » 08 Mar 2013, 07:08

I'm done with the surgery and at home. I'm in a lot of pain. They gave me perocet, which makes it manageable, but I still feel very raw. So, I'm not going to be one of those people for whom there is very little post-op pain. I'm dreading the first poop. My doctor gave the post-op downlow to my mother, who is both hard of hearing and doesn't understand any medical words they use. So all she reported back to me is that it looks like hamburger down there. I have no idea what they ended up doing during the surgery. From the amount of pain, I'm guessing its way more than LIS.
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Re: Surrendering to the Knife

Postby coconut » 08 Mar 2013, 08:12

Surgery report for those who want to know what it was like:
You really need someone to spend the whole day with you for this stuff. I'm single, so I asked my mother to help. I didn't want to be a pain in the ass, so I told her it was OK with me if she went off and did errands while I was in surgery. But the way the rhythm of the surgery is, she really couldn't, which caused some anxiety on her part. They also ask for someone to stay with you for 12 hours after the surgery. Just a heads up for those of us who live alone - the outpatient nature of this surgery presents some challenges.
The nurses at my hospital were wonderful. Really made this a better experience.
I had to go in two hours early, so I brought in stuff to entertain myself, but I didn't use them. Everything is pretty swift, and they had me in various positions that did not allow for Soduko.
All the doctors came to introduce themselves. Apparently, there were not one but two interns sitting in. I hope they were just watching and not knifing. We would have words if they did the surgery. I was relieved to find that the person doing the sedation was a woman. I don't feel comfortable in that kind of vulnerable position with only men in the room.
They had me put a disposable gown and booties on. The gown was made of this stuff that insulates you. Totally cool in that it really was warm like a sweater, but it looked like a paper hospital gown. There's no place to put your stuff, so my mom had to take my backpack with everything in it while I got taken to surgery.
They wheeled me in the operating room. Lots of people in there. Lots of machines that go "ping!" (I feel special.) They had me get on a table face down with pillows strategically placed to make being face down comfortable. The table started to tip slowly like the CRS's examining table and that's the last thing I remember.
When I woke up, I was in a lot of pain. I had a nurse right there, and she put pain relief stuff in my IV. I went through three doses before I got some relief. Finally, she added a pill of Percocet and that made me more comfortable. The nurse was great. She really made things better, but the truth is that I was crying and shaking. Its over now, but I thought I'd report that so that if it happens to you, you'll know that sometimes it does happen this way. I was very lucid right away. Not very groggy at all but hurting and my defenses were down enough to allow me to cry like a big baby in public.
They have this hose thing that they connected to the hospital gown in a way that pumped hot air directly onto me. This was WONDERFUL. I visualized myself on a big sunny rock in the woods where I like to hike. The hot air felt like the sun beating down on me.
After the pain and the shaking were under control, they brought me into recovery room number 2, where my challenge was to pee before I could go home. I hadn't dranken (drunken? drank?) anything that morning, but they did put in an IV and had pumped me full of liquids, so I had to go! Potty emergency time! But I couldn't. The stuff they used to numb my butt also put my urinary tract to sleep. Eventually, they had to catheterize me to let the pee out before I could go home. I didn't want to do this, but looking back, I'm glad I let them. It didn't cause any harm and I was much more comfortable afterwards. I was worried that I wouldn't be able to pee when I got home, but 5 hours later, I did pee on my own. Woohoo! The post op instructions I was given advised me to take a hot bath and pee into the bath, and to go to the emergency room to be catheterized if that didn't work. But I don't have to do any of that. So there's a bright spot!
I went home and my mother got my percocet prescription filled for me. I'm finding that I need to take a new pill once every 3 1/2 hours. The prescription says 1 or 2 every 4-6 hours. Since I'm only taking one, I think I'm good.
I have a pattern of napping, drinking/eating a little, peeing, and watching 30 Rock right now. I even woke up for my pain pill in the middle of the night. It takes 1 episode of 30 Rock before I feel the new Percocet pill kick in.
Stay tuned for the next episode: The dreaded first poop.
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Re: Surrendering to the Knife

Postby jr2 » 08 Mar 2013, 10:32

Coconut,
So glad you're on the other side now and will be starting the healing process... one step at a time. Your description of surgery brings back many memories of various surgeries I've had too. They probably used propofol on you as the general anesthetic, which is why you woke up and were so lucid on waking. They use it a lot in day surgeries because patients wake up so quickly from it. The down side is you wake up with more pain that way.
Oh man, the shivers. After my last surgery I had them for weeks, violently. There was nothing to do for me to get me warm. The hot air thingie sounds wonderful.
So glad you could pee. I know that difficulty too, and the initial hesitancy for the catheter but then you're glad you let them do it after it's over. When they told me my bladder was so distended it couldn't go on its own I knew I needed it.
I so hope the pain continues to be manageable for you, that things just get exponentially better each day, and that very soon this will all just be a memory for you.
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Re: Surrendering to the Knife

Postby coconut » 08 Mar 2013, 11:13

I talked to the doctor and he said that I'm having more pain because the fissure is really deep. He said the surgery went smoothy and I didn't have any additional procedures while I was out.
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Re: Surrendering to the Knife

Postby jr2 » 08 Mar 2013, 11:14

Did he do the LIS and a fissurectomy?
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Re: Surrendering to the Knife

Postby coconut » 08 Mar 2013, 11:18

jr2 wrote:Coconut,
So glad you're on the other side now and will be starting the healing process... one step at a time. Your description of surgery brings back many memories of various surgeries I've had too. They probably used propofol on you as the general anesthetic, which is why you woke up and were so lucid on waking. They use it a lot in day surgeries because patients wake up so quickly from it. The down side is you wake up with more pain that way.
Oh man, the shivers. After my last surgery I had them for weeks, violently. There was nothing to do for me to get me warm. The hot air thingie sounds wonderful.
So glad you could pee. I know that difficulty too, and the initial hesitancy for the catheter but then you're glad you let them do it after it's over. When they told me my bladder was so distended it couldn't go on its own I knew I needed it.
I so hope the pain continues to be manageable for you, that things just get exponentially better each day, and that very soon this will all just be a memory for you.

Yikes! Getting the shivers for weeks would be tough!
Yes. He did the LIS and fissurectomy, but he doesn't like calling it that since you can't remove a tear, but just give it fresh sides to heal.
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