LIS One Day Away

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Re: LIS One Day Away

Postby lindwe » 03 Apr 2012, 07:05

Hi Guys
I do remember doing a double take the first time I came across a bum-bag described as a 'fanny bag'. The mind boggled!
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Re: LIS One Day Away

Postby rasmith3530 » 03 Apr 2012, 16:03

Hey all, sounds like everybody's pretty chipper which is a good thing. Carol Ann, I'm glad things are evening out for you, and that you got to enjoy a meal cooked outside the house for a change.
Yes, the semantics of our language are really interesting. I grew up with parents who were into the whole sports car scene back in the 1950s and learned how different parts had different names in England as opposed to the U.S. For those curious about such things, my early memory of a "family car" were my mom's '54 Alfa Spyder and my dad's '54 MG-TF. In 1958, they would go on to trade both of those in on a pair of Austin-Healey 106s. I grew up in what was called the "Pony Car" era, so I was mainly interested in Mustangs (5) and Camaros (2). That said, I have owned two MG-Bs, one a '64 Roadster that I swapped a later 1967 engine into, and the other, a 1972 B GT, that one built to full Leyland Stage IV spec.
Enough about cars and names though. Nothing really new to report on my butt, bum, fanny, rear end or whatever you want to call it. It's doing fine and holding its own.
Now for the big news, my trip to the VA (Veterans Administration) clinic. I had not been to a VA facility in nearly two decades, so I was not quite sure what to expect, especially in light of all the budget cuts over the past decade or so. Well, I was quite pleasantly surprised. I was examined top to bottom, left to right, forwards and backwards, and all over the place. They addressed things I hadn't even complained about! It's all about "Wellness," getting and keeping you well. I was issued a pedometer and signed up for a nutrition/weight/fitness program called MOVE. I'm being scheduled for a podiatry exam, and for a diabetic opthomology exam(even though I just got new glasses last year). We're not going to address the fissure issue, as that appears to be doing quite well.
Now, for my two main issues, the problems with my tremors and blackout/concentration issues, the doctor asked a lot of questions and also wants me to get all my history so we can start a baseline. I also need to get my MRI for my back. The doctor doesn't want to duplicate anything that has been done. I am also scheduled to get a series of very comprehensive blood tests later this week. Once that is all gathered and reviewed, we'll plan a course of action.
I was not rushed and as mentioned, I was seriously examined both in regards to main complaint and the other items as mentioned.
For those here in the U.S. the VA medical system is a single payer universal health care plan, and it works! I experienced no "Death Panels" and was treated efficiently, courteously, and not like a number.
Have a "painless day" all!
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Re: LIS One Day Away

Postby Sweet Bugaboo » 03 Apr 2012, 17:59

rasmith3530 wrote:Hey all, sounds like everybody's pretty chipper which is a good thing. Carol Ann, I'm glad things are evening out for you, and that you got to enjoy a meal cooked outside the house for a change.
Yes, the semantics of our language are really interesting. I grew up with parents who were into the whole sports car scene back in the 1950s and learned how different parts had different names in England as opposed to the U.S. For those curious about such things, my early memory of a "family car" were my mom's '54 Alfa Spyder and my dad's '54 MG-TF. In 1958, they would go on to trade both of those in on a pair of Austin-Healey 106s. I grew up in what was called the "Pony Car" era, so I was mainly interested in Mustangs (5) and Camaros (2). That said, I have owned two MG-Bs, one a '64 Roadster that I swapped a later 1967 engine into, and the other, a 1972 B GT, that one built to full Leyland Stage IV spec.
Enough about cars and names though. Nothing really new to report on my butt, bum, fanny, rear end or whatever you want to call it. It's doing fine and holding its own.
Now for the big news, my trip to the VA (Veterans Administration) clinic. I had not been to a VA facility in nearly two decades, so I was not quite sure what to expect, especially in light of all the budget cuts over the past decade or so. Well, I was quite pleasantly surprised. I was examined top to bottom, left to right, forwards and backwards, and all over the place. They addressed things I hadn't even complained about! It's all about "Wellness," getting and keeping you well. I was issued a pedometer and signed up for a nutrition/weight/fitness program called MOVE. I'm being scheduled for a podiatry exam, and for a diabetic opthomology exam(even though I just got new glasses last year). We're not going to address the fissure issue, as that appears to be doing quite well.
Now, for my two main issues, the problems with my tremors and blackout/concentration issues, the doctor asked a lot of questions and also wants me to get all my history so we can start a baseline. I also need to get my MRI for my back. The doctor doesn't want to duplicate anything that has been done. I am also scheduled to get a series of very comprehensive blood tests later this week. Once that is all gathered and reviewed, we'll plan a course of action.
I was not rushed and as mentioned, I was seriously examined both in regards to main complaint and the other items as mentioned.
For those here in the U.S. the VA medical system is a single payer universal health care plan, and it works! I experienced no "Death Panels" and was treated efficiently, courteously, and not like a number.
Have a "painless day" all!

Rob, I'm glad you had a good experience with the VA hospital system. I'm sure they'll be very thorough while addressing your particular health concerns. --- The tremors and the blackouts - especially the blackouts - have to be investigated, IMO. The blackouts sound unnerving - I can't imagine what you must go through with those . . .
Anyhow, my dad (now deceased) had very good care at our VA hospital, and my brother continues to receive the best of care. He has certain issues - and he's always treated very kindly, and we couldn't ask for better doctors for him. Thank God he is a Vet and can get his care there, because we could never afford his health care, otherwise. He served during the Vietnam War, too - so, I think Vets who serve during a war qualify for certain extra benefits.
Before I forget, my youngest son watches a t.v. show, called "Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmer," and a Chicago restaurant was featured -- a place called, "Alinea," IIRC. I'm wondering if you've heard of that restaurant? Apparently, the owner is some type of scientist. --- I tell ya what, I can't believe what some people will eat. There's one guy - Adam Richman - in the show, "Man Versus Food," (he tries to eat large amounts of food at one sitting) and I can't believe what that guy eats! One of these days, his bottom is going to make him pay dearly for that abuse.
Ah, your cars! They sound divine. I love, love, love antique/vintage/collectable/unique cars. Mustangs are great! My first car was a Camaro - sweet little car, too. My friend had a '65 Mustang, and we had a ball with that car. --- Currently, I'm working on collecting cars for the "dream car fleet" collection. I may never finish it, but I have two of the cars I've always wanted - a '93 MB E320 Cabriolet, and a '99 XJ8 Jaguar. Still on my list? - a '56 Cadillac series "62" (I would also be thrilled to have a '57 Eldorado), a 1980 MB 450 SL, and a late '70s VW Bug. --- I know - those cars are not particularly exotic, certainly not like a '54 MG TF - I mean, THAT is one heck of a car. But, that's my dream list.
The thing about driving -- my bottom/bum/fanny/rear (lol) is finally deciding it's okay for me to drive. When I tried driving, about three weeks' ago, I was in pain. It's easier for me to be a passenger, rather than drive. I was out for a bit today, driving, and I came home exhausted.
Let us know how your VA care goes . . . if it's anything like my brother's experiences with the VA, you should get excellent care.
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Re: LIS One Day Away

Postby rasmith3530 » 04 Apr 2012, 01:53

Carol Ann, wow, you got to drive, cool. I do miss that, but because I was pulled over for driving erratically the first time I had one of my blackouts, and I've had a few more while behind the wheel, my doctor does not consider it safe to have me driving, and, I guess, I have to agree.
Over the years, I owned five Mustangs. My first, bought from a fellow Mustang club member, was a 1966 GT, equipped with the 289 Hi-Po engine and 4 speed. I modified the suspension on that car to duplicate the Shelby GT-350R, and built the engine to put out about 350 horsepower. After playing with that one for a while, I came across an ad in the newspaper offering a '67 Mustang GT350 for only $600. I figured it must have been a misprint, but decided to call anyway. It turned out the owner and his friend, after rebuilding the engine, had taken the car out "to see what it would do." They ended up involved in a chase with suburban cops and the guy lost his license. He owned about five or six cars. His wife chose a station wagon and gave him less than 30 days to get rid of the rest. I didn't even argue price, I just handed the fellow the cash and drove away. The car had been equipped with the dealer installed updated Shelby engine camshaft and dual carburetor manifold. It had at some point been custom painted in this flip-flop blue green paint that looked like different colors from different angles. Sadly, the paint had cracked in what is called "spiderwebbing" and looked horrible. It was also missing three of its four side scoops. We took the car down to bare metal and refinished it in factory Windsor White with the blue Shelby twin stripes. The car had a white interior that took two weeks of devoted cleaning with the seats and carpet removed to get back looking nice. Once finished though, it was a very pretty car. Sadly, I didn't get to enjoy it all that long, for one night, when I stopped by a local coffee house where a bunch of sports car fanatics hung out, a friend of mine informed me about a trade they'd taken in. The car was a pristine 1969 Boss 302. The following day, I drove up north to the dealer after work, drove the car and struck a deal. Luckily, one of the guys from our Mustang club had been watching my build up of the Shelby with great interest and bought it without hesitation. For its maiden voyage under his ownership, he took me to the dealer to grab the Boss.
I have to say right here that this is the car I most regret ever selling. The moment you sat in the car, and especially after firing that motor to life, you realized this car had been ordered for one purpose, and that was to drive quickly. Right away, you would note that there was a block-off plate where a radio would normally sit. The car was equipped with the super Drag Pack which included a special heavy duty cooling system, an oil cooler and remote oil filter, high output charging system with the battery relocated to the trunk, a heavy duty clutch, and a 3.91 ratio Detroit Locker 9" rear axle. The Boss came with a Hurst shift lever and "T" handle for its 4 speed transmission. This car just wreaked of power. Because of the "locker" rear axle, it was nearly impossible to not sqeal the tires going around turns. I loved this car. It was in the factory bright yellow, and the original owner had resisted ordering the "sports slats" for the back window, I assume to conserve weight.
I eventually traded in the '69 in favor of a '71 Boss 351 that we'd taken in trade on a Hurst Olds 442 W-30 at the dealer where I worked. To put it mildly, I was not real happy with the newer car. The Mustang had grown by 1971, and that growth came with increased weight and bulk that detracted from the more powerful engine, and made the newer car less precise through corners. One other major shortcoming was the redesign of the roofline whice left one with a pretty us less rear window. I ended up getting rid of it to purchase a very nice '69 Camaro Z/28.
Later on, I would own one more Mustang, a 1980 coupe I bought to build as a project. I ended up replacing out the little 2.3 liter four in favor of a 351 Cleveland Cobra-Jet.It was a fun toy.
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Re: LIS One Day Away

Postby Sweet Bugaboo » 04 Apr 2012, 11:25

rasmith3530 wrote:Carol Ann, wow, you got to drive, cool. I do miss that, but because I was pulled over for driving erratically the first time I had one of my blackouts, and I've had a few more while behind the wheel, my doctor does not consider it safe to have me driving, and, I guess, I have to agree.
Over the years, I owned five Mustangs. My first, bought from a fellow Mustang club member, was a 1966 GT, equipped with the 289 Hi-Po engine and 4 speed. I modified the suspension on that car to duplicate the Shelby GT-350R, and built the engine to put out about 350 horsepower. After playing with that one for a while, I came across an ad in the newspaper offering a '67 Mustang GT350 for only $600. I figured it must have been a misprint, but decided to call anyway. It turned out the owner and his friend, after rebuilding the engine, had taken the car out "to see what it would do." They ended up involved in a chase with suburban cops and the guy lost his license. He owned about five or six cars. His wife chose a station wagon and gave him less than 30 days to get rid of the rest. I didn't even argue price, I just handed the fellow the cash and drove away. The car had been equipped with the dealer installed updated Shelby engine camshaft and dual carburetor manifold. It had at some point been custom painted in this flip-flop blue green paint that looked like different colors from different angles. Sadly, the paint had cracked in what is called "spiderwebbing" and looked horrible. It was also missing three of its four side scoops. We took the car down to bare metal and refinished it in factory Windsor White with the blue Shelby twin stripes. The car had a white interior that took two weeks of devoted cleaning with the seats and carpet removed to get back looking nice. Once finished though, it was a very pretty car. Sadly, I didn't get to enjoy it all that long, for one night, when I stopped by a local coffee house where a bunch of sports car fanatics hung out, a friend of mine informed me about a trade they'd taken in. The car was a pristine 1969 Boss 302. The following day, I drove up north to the dealer after work, drove the car and struck a deal. Luckily, one of the guys from our Mustang club had been watching my build up of the Shelby with great interest and bought it without hesitation. For its maiden voyage under his ownership, he took me to the dealer to grab the Boss.
I have to say right here that this is the car I most regret ever selling. The moment you sat in the car, and especially after firing that motor to life, you realized this car had been ordered for one purpose, and that was to drive quickly. Right away, you would note that there was a block-off plate where a radio would normally sit. The car was equipped with the super Drag Pack which included a special heavy duty cooling system, an oil cooler and remote oil filter, high output charging system with the battery relocated to the trunk, a heavy duty clutch, and a 3.91 ratio Detroit Locker 9" rear axle. The Boss came with a Hurst shift lever and "T" handle for its 4 speed transmission. This car just wreaked of power. Because of the "locker" rear axle, it was nearly impossible to not sqeal the tires going around turns. I loved this car. It was in the factory bright yellow, and the original owner had resisted ordering the "sports slats" for the back window, I assume to conserve weight.
I eventually traded in the '69 in favor of a '71 Boss 351 that we'd taken in trade on a Hurst Olds 442 W-30 at the dealer where I worked. To put it mildly, I was not real happy with the newer car. The Mustang had grown by 1971, and that growth came with increased weight and bulk that detracted from the more powerful engine, and made the newer car less precise through corners. One other major shortcoming was the redesign of the roofline whice left one with a pretty us less rear window. I ended up getting rid of it to purchase a very nice '69 Camaro Z/28.
Later on, I would own one more Mustang, a 1980 coupe I bought to build as a project. I ended up replacing out the little 2.3 liter four in favor of a 351 Cleveland Cobra-Jet.It was a fun toy.

Rob, your '69 Boss 302 sounds like it was a great car! Actually, I'm intrigued by all the cars you've mentioned. You certainly seem to know a thing or two about cars' engines, etc., as well.
My h.s. boyfriend had a '72 Ford Grand Torino - white - and it was probably the prettiest car in town. I've yet to find an online pic that looks exactly like his car - but boy, what a car it was! I can't speak much about the mechanical/engine part of it, because I don't know cars that well -- but it was a beauty of a car.
I'm glad to finally be driving - but it does tend to make my bottom more sore, a little. I know that when I tried to drive about three weeks' ago, it was VERY uncomfortable for me. Better now, but I'm still a bit sore. I must heal slowly . . . that, plus I did have two procedures done, rather than only the LIS.
Because of your blackouts, I would think that driving would be off limits, until/unless the blackouts stop.
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Re: LIS One Day Away

Postby rasmith3530 » 04 Apr 2012, 15:34

Yes, the driving is a no-no for the time being. I learned about cars by working in a service station while in high school and by rebuilding one of my first cars from the frame up. It was a 1957 Chevy Nomad. It was a fun project, but we overdid it on the paint. Our head mechanic at the shop had been a combination guy (mechanical and body) from the old school. I had to do the grunt work, but he applied 21 coats of hand rubbed (my part) laquer paint in a chocolate brown metallic with gold flake added. The paint looked about an inch deep. The car cost me an entire year's pay to build, including the $150 I paid for the car to start with, but it was like having a virtually brand new '57 Chevy back in 1970. I did a number of modifications as we went along too. I sold the car because I was paranoid to park it anywhere for fear it would get a paint chip.
I went on to spend the next fifteen years (after a stint in the Navy working on jet fighters) as a professional dealership mechanic then service manager, and learned my trade well. I also used to crew a couple road racer's cars when I wasn't running an event. That is how I came to learn so much about cars. Before going to work at the gas station, I worked at a bike shop after school, and later in life, I used to help a friend out at his shop in my spare time, so I'm pretty well versed on bikes as well. As a kid, that grew to first minbikes and then actual motorcycles, and I've built a number of custom bikes, either for myself or others. Also over the years, I've ridden through 44 of the 48 Continental United States plus Ontario, CANADA.
It has been fun, but due to my condition, it bothers me even more not being able to drive, as for me, it is not just a way to get from point A to point B.
You mentioned that you would like to own a bug. At one point, I had five of them, including a Meyers Manx dune buggy and a narrow-eyed Baja Bug. I also had split windshield Type II (microbus). And, as long as you mentioned Mercedes, one of my last projects was to take a 1984 300D-T (Turbo Diesel) and convert it to run on waste vegetable oil.
The world of cars and motorcycles is a blast. Today, if I get past my issues, I'd like to work on some electric powered stuff. If electric cars make you think of Prius and Volt, Google Tesla sports car!
Anyway, nothing new to report health wise. Hope you are doing well. Try using one of those chair cushions they sell for kitchen chairs for some extra padding while driving. If you've got a thrift store locally, you can generally find them for a buck or two. At that price, you can afford to pitch it when your rear heals more.
Good luck and take care. <3
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Re: LIS One Day Away

Postby Sweet Bugaboo » 04 Apr 2012, 21:13

Rob, I had to look up '57 Chevy Nomad - but it looks like a neat, vintage station wagon -- and btw, I totally understand about paint chips, etc. I'm so paranoid that someone will yank the hood ornament off my Jag, or park too close to it and ding the side, that I'm very careful where I take it. The leather is beautiful inside - in fact, the car only has 31k mi. on it, which isn't bad for a 13-yr.-old car. So, I'm going to have seat covers and also a dash cover made. (I'm hoping the seat covers will somehow pad things a bit for my bottom, as well -- meanwhile, your chair cushion idea is a good one.)
As to bikes - of the motorcycle kind - I remember riding around on the back of one, back in h.s. (a different boyfriend). Those were the days! --- I'll bet that riding in Canada is beautiful. I have a friend who lives there, and she has a Harley and always emails me the most beautiful pics from the places she rides to on her bike.
Okay, so I also had to look up the Meyers Manx dune buggy -- and what cool little vehicles those are! -- Oh, and I looked up the narrow-eyed Baja Bug, too . . . and my question is, are the Bugs made that way, with the lights closer together, or is that a custom job?
Like you, I love interesting cars and bikes (I mean, the pedal kind of bike, lol). I'm really a retro gal, at heart -- and I'd love to have on my cat-eye sunglasses, driving a '56 Caddy. Maybe someday.
I don't have much to report health wise, either. Just the same bit of soreness and some discomfort. Nothing major, and I expect (hope) it will all eventually fade away.
Hope you've had a good day. <3
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Re: LIS One Day Away

Postby rasmith3530 » 09 Apr 2012, 16:44

I haven't posted an update recently, because up until now, there hasn't been anything new to report. My recovery has been going well, with no pain or unwanted side effects save for the very faintest of a discharge when I blow wind. That hasn't been solid, more just something that a quick swipe with toile paper would take care of. I've been careful to clean up, at least with a wipe afterwards.
Today, however, I had an unplanned event. I felt that a bowel movement was coming on, so I headed to the bathroom in the store I was at. I felt just the slightest bit of pain, nothing to speak of, but when I went to wipe, there was blood. Not a lot, but blood all the same. I hope this isn't a harbinger of bad things to come.
Yesterday, for Easter, we had ham. I had cooked veggies and a bit of mashed potatoes. I didn't really eat a lot at all, so I'm not certain that the meal had anything to do with it.
I have been under significant stress, due to both my health issues, and some personal stuff as well. That may have more bearing on things, and I hope what I experienced today was just a minor thing without further setback.
I do not want to spend the rest of my life with this monster!
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Re: LIS One Day Away

Postby rasmith3530 » 09 Apr 2012, 16:48

I am so sorry, because I forgot to say that I do hope everyone is healing smoothly.
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Re: LIS One Day Away

Postby Sweet Bugaboo » 09 Apr 2012, 17:11

rasmith3530 wrote:I haven't posted an update recently, because up until now, there hasn't been anything new to report. My recovery has been going well, with no pain or unwanted side effects save for the very faintest of a discharge when I blow wind. That hasn't been solid, more just something that a quick swipe with toile paper would take care of. I've been careful to clean up, at least with a wipe afterwards.
Today, however, I had an unplanned event. I felt that a bowel movement was coming on, so I headed to the bathroom in the store I was at. I felt just the slightest bit of pain, nothing to speak of, but when I went to wipe, there was blood. Not a lot, but blood all the same. I hope this isn't a harbinger of bad things to come.
Yesterday, for Easter, we had ham. I had cooked veggies and a bit of mashed potatoes. I didn't really eat a lot at all, so I'm not certain that the meal had anything to do with it.
I have been under significant stress, due to both my health issues, and some personal stuff as well. That may have more bearing on things, and I hope what I experienced today was just a minor thing without further setback.
I do not want to spend the rest of my life with this monster!

Neither do I, Rob. I think the healing just takes time, time, time, time - and MORE time.
Hang in there.
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